Monday Morning State News Summary
Mon, 14 Jan 2013 02:00:45 EST
(Capitol-Mental Health)
A mental health organization in Michigan is renewing it's push to require
insurance companies in Michigan to treat mental health coverage the same way
they treat physical health coverage.
The Michigan Association of Community Mental Health Boards is making its push on
the heels of comments by the Governor and others who say Michigan should look
closer at the mental health issue, which was the center of attention in a recent
mass killing at a school in Connecticut.
However, their proposal has so far largely fallen on deaf ears, and is met with
direct opposition from the insurance industry.
Mike Vizena of the M-A-C-M-H admits it's not an easy issue to push, adding that
(quote) "folks just do not understand the importance of getting this kind of
treatment."
The Michigan Legislature steps up its activity in Lansing after the Governor's
State of the State address this week.


(UM Study-US Early Deaths)
A new national report says that on average, Americans die sooner and experience
higher rates of disease and injury than people in other high-income countries.
The report from the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine found
that this health disadvantage exists at all ages from birth to age 75 and that
even advantaged Americans-those who have health insurance, college educations,
higher incomes and healthy behaviors-appear to be sicker than their peers in
other rich nations.
Ana Diez-Roux, University of Michigan professor and chair of the Department of
Epidemiology in the School of Public Health, served on the panel that wrote the
report, and says that (quote) "the systemic nature of the problem was surprising
to the committee, and suggests that a number of interrelated environmental and
policy factors may be playing an important role."
The report goes on to say that Americans are dying and suffering at rates that
researchers say are unnecessary because people in other high-income countries
are living longer lives and enjoying better health.
Authors say that what concerns them is why, for decades, the US has been
slipping behind.


(Pittsfield Twp-Wife Murder)
A Pittsfield Township man has been arraigned and remains behind bars, facing
murder charges in connection with his wifes death.
Forty-four-year-old Jean Pierre Trias faces one count of open murder and police
say he will remain in custody at the Washtenaw County Jail pending a preliminary
examination.
The body of 53-year-old Katherine Kellogg Porter was found Friday evening at the
couples home by police who were conducting a welfare check.
(WWJ, Detroit)


(Pontiac-Police Car Hit)
A Pontiac woman is in jail after police say she hit a parked Oakland County
Sheriff's patrol car while driving impaired.
The 28-year-old woman hit the car that was parked just after 1 a.m. Saturday.
The woman and her 8-year-old daughter who was a passenger in the car were
uninjured.
Police charged the woman with suspected drunk driving and child endangerment.
(Metro Source)


(Muskegon-Brunswick Factory Demolish)
A former manufacturing plant in Muskegon that produced bowling equipment for a
century is scheduled to be demolished this year.
Brunswick Bowling Products reportedly has contractors working to bring down
buildings at the 280,000-square-foot site near Business route 31 by this summer.
Production at the facilities began in 1906 when Brunswick moved its bowling and
billiards manufacturing operations to Muskegon with 87 employees.
Muskegon will still be at the center of Brunswicks bowling world.
Some 175 employees remain working for the company in Muskegon, where the
worldwide management, research and development, marketing and warehousing of
Brunswick Bowling Products are headquartered.
(Help from: WGHN, Grand Haven)


(MI/FL-Plane Crash)
Federal investigators are on the scene of a deadly plane crash in Florida that
reportedly left a man from Michigan hospitalized with second- and third-degree
burns.
The plane crash-landed on the campus of New College of Florida. A spokesman says
the plane clipped the tops of two trees before crashing. He says the college
plans to hold classes today (Monday).
It's reported that the pilot died at the scene. The passenger, who survived, is
reportedly a 63-year-old man from the Ann Arbor area.
(WWJ, Detroit)


(Saginaw-Historic Buildings Renovation)
Two historic buildings in downtown Saginaw will undergo a major transformation
over the next few months.
The Bancroft and Eddy buildings have been sold to Lakeshore Management of
Lakewood Ohio, which plans $5 million in renovations to create 150 new luxury
apartments, plus restaurant and retail space.
The buildings have served as low income housing for nearly 30 years. The
Michigan State Housing Development Authority relocated tenants and handled the
sale.
Saginaw Downtown Development Authority Director Beth Ernat hopes the change will
have a trickle-down effect, attracting new business and other development to the
area.
Getting rid of the low income housing has long been seen as a key to
redeveloping downtown Saginaw, which as was once a bustling retail area.
The renovations are expected to be done by mid-summer, with the apartments ready
to rent.
(WSGW, Saginaw)


(MI-Uncalimed Winnings)
State Lottery officials say 28-million dollars in lottery winnings went
unclaimed during the 2012 fiscal year.
That same fiscal year saw a total of one-point-four-billion-dollars paid out.
Under the state's lottery law, winners have one year to claim their prizes.
Any unclaimed money after a year has passed goes into the state School Aid Fund.

(Metro Source)


(Detroit-Antiques Roadshow)
Antiques Roadshow will be kicking off their 2013 tour in Detroit - the shows
first stop in the Motor City since an episode that first aired in 1997.
The show, in its 18th season, will be visiting eight cities in America where
some of the countrys top experts offer free evaluations of antiques and
collectibles - revealing the often-surprising history and value of these items.
It will be a 35 episode season, which airs on PBS. The Detroit stop is scheduled
for June 1.
There are details that still need to be worked out, such as where the show will
film in Detroit, but tickets are now available and must be obtained in advance.
Ticket applications and complete ticketing rules are available at
www.pbs.org/antiques or by calling 1-888-762-3749.
A limited number of ticket recipients will be selected at random from all
eligible entries. Ticket holders are invited to bring two items for a free
verbal approximation of value by experts from the worlds leading auction houses,
independent appraisers, auctioneers and dealers. All ticket holders are
guaranteed an appraisal.
(WWJ, Detroit)


(MSU Study-Cancer treatment)
Cancer treatment in pill form is now transforming how care is delivered, but a
new Michigan State University study has underscored the challenges patients face
in administering their own chemotherapy outside the supervised environment of a
cancer clinic.
Chemo pills can target specific cancers better than some traditional
intravenous drugs, according to Sandra Spoelstra, the MSU assistant professor of
nursing who led the study.
But they also can be difficult for patients to take, because of complex
instructions, and often include side effects.
During the study, published in the journal Cancer Nursing, more than 40 percent
of participating patients took too many pills or missed doses with poor
adherence more likely among those with complex treatment regimens.
The researchers randomly assigned the patients to one of three groups. Members
of the first group only had help from an automated calling system, developed at
MSU, to see if they were following their prescriptions and help them monitor and
manage symptoms.
The second group got the automated calls and follow-up calls from nurses with
strategies for sticking to their pill regimen.
The rest got automated calls and nurse advice on both adhering to their regimen
and managing symptoms.
Patients in all three groups reported less severe symptoms at the end of the
study.
And the automated calls were just as effective alone as when they were coupled
with nurse guidance.
That suggests the automated system could be a simple and inexpensive way to help
some patients take their drugs properly, according to Spoelstra.
The small study will be the springboard for more comprehensive research,
according to MSU officials.



(Weekend Lottery)
There were no tickets that matched all the numbers in Saturday's Classic Lotto
Jackpot drawing worth three-point-eight-five (M) million dollars.
That means Wednesday's jackpot will be worth four-point-zero-five (M) million
dollars ($4,050,000).   
The numbers drawn Saturday were: 04, 12, 24, 33, 34, and 43.
The winning numbers for the midday 3 lottery on Sunday were: 3-9-3.
The winning numbers for the midday 4 lottery were: 3-8-4-3.
The winning numbers for the evening 3 lottery were:   6-3-2.
The winning numbers for the evening 4 lottery were: 9-9-0-1.
The winning numbers for the fantasy 5 lottery were:   05-11-22-23-36.
The winning numbers for the keno lottery were: 02, 05, 06, 13, 16, 20, 26, 31,
33, 34, 36, 42, 54, 55, 57, 58, 60, 64, 67, 70, 76, 77.
The winning numbers for the Powerball lottery for Saturday are: 10-14-21-23-47.
The powerball number was: 07.    
The next drawing will be held Wednesday.
The jackpot is projected to be $90 (M) million dollars.
The winning numbers for the Midday 3 lottery on Saturday were: 7-0-7.
The winning numbers for the Midday 4 lottery saturday were: 7-2-9-8.
The winning numbers for the Evening 3 saturday were: 8-4-7.
The winning numbers for the Evening 4 game saturday were: 1-8-6-0.
The winning numbers for the Fantasy 5 lottery were: 19-28-30-33-35.
The winning Keno numbers Saturday were: 03, 11, 12, 16, 19, 23, 28, 30, 31, 33,
38, 39, 40, 50, 52, 58, 60, 65, 67, 70, 77, 80.
Tuesday's Mega Millions Jackpot will be worth $62 (m) million dollars.


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